2000-08-16 / Front Page

22-year-old Holmdel man premiering his first film ‘Driven Together’ to be

22-year-old Holmdel man premiering his first film
‘Driven Together’ to be


David Kaiserman
David Kaiserman

shown Aug. 26 at

Aberdeen theater

By cindy tietjen

Staff Writer


In a promotion photograph, David Kaiserman of Holmdel gets top billing for his first film  effort, Driven Together, which will premier at noon and midnight Aug. 26 at the Clearview Strathmore Cinemas in Aberdeen.
In a promotion photograph, David Kaiserman of Holmdel gets top billing for his first film effort, Driven Together, which will premier at noon and midnight Aug. 26 at the Clearview Strathmore Cinemas in Aberdeen.

HOLMDEL — Stephen Spielberg … George Lucas … David Kaiserman … David Kaiserman?

While the name of this Holmdel native may not sound familiar now, it could become a household name in the future.

Kaiserman, only 22, is on his way to making his own mark in the film industry.

A recent graduate of Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, he makes his directorial debut in Driven Together, an independent film that he wrote and produced with all volunteers and no outside funding.

The film will premiere at noon and again at midnight on Saturday, Aug. 26, at the Clearview Strathmore Cinemas, Route 34 in Aberdeen.

The inspiration for Driven Together came from many different things.

"Someone introduced me to the film Clockwork Orange, and I was so amazed by the way the main character was portrayed," said Kaiserman. "I thought to myself, ‘I can make a movie,’ and I started working on it immediately."

At the time, Kaiserman was at Fairleigh Dickinson working on a degree in engineering.

"I had many job offers in the engineering field, but this was something I had to do," said Kaiserman, who credits his parents and family for supporting his decision.

Once Kaiserman decided wholeheartedly to make the movie, things began to move rapidly.

He started writing the script in July of 1999, and now, only a little over a year later, he is hosting the premiere.

"I already had the characters in mind before I started writing the script. I am fascinated by the way the mind works, so I knew I wanted a character that I could develop," said Kaiserman. "I think that the movie reflects that."

The main character of Driven Together, Paige, is a mentally unstable woman who is being chased by skeletons from her past. She enlists the help of a doctor, who, while trying to help her, has to fight his growing attraction to her.

According to Kaiserman, the film takes viewers through unnerving situations, leaving them charged and wanting more.

Driven Together was shot locally in Bayshore Community Hospital, at select private homes in Holmdel and at the Internet Cafe in Red Bank.

According to Kaiserman, these establishments were highly supportive and tolerant of the arduous tasks of movie making.

"Red Bank and Holmdel were so receptive to what I was trying to accomplish," said Kaiserman, who is Holmdel’s appointed film commissioner. "This movie could not have been successful if it weren’t for their understanding."

Additionally, the majority of the cast and crew are all from Monmouth County.

"Twenty-seven percent of the crew was my family," said Kaiserman. "There were so many people that were supportive of this project."

Unlike so many other filmmakers who have millions of dollars, Kaiserman had no budget for Driven Together.

"I am so pleased with the way this film turned out, but I say to myself, ‘If this is what I can do with no money, can you imagine what I could accomplish if I actually had a budget?’ " Kaiserman said.

By using the new digital video method of filming, he was able to keep costs down.

According to Kaiserman, digital video allows filmmakers to shoot movies on a lower budget while still retaining great chrominance, luminance, brightness, contrast and color.

Using a digital camera, Kaiserman and the crew were able to shoot 20 hours of raw footage for the final one-hour edit.

By taking advantage of this new medium, Kaiserman was able to inexpensively edit the movie on his home computer.

Jaime Schmidt, the film production assistant, said that Kaiserman’s professionalism aided in the speedy production of the film.

"David was always one step ahead of the game, and the production worked like a well-oiled machine," said Schmidt. "When it was time to shoot a scene, David was on top of everything."

Aside from attracting arts and entertainment professionals, Kaiserman is also premiering his film to provide networking opportunities.

"I want to help other professionals make connections in this industry, and I also want to meet people who are interested in supporting local talent," he said.

The networking portion of the premiere will take place one hour before each showing and is open only to cast members, the crew and industry professionals.

The public is invited to the noon and midnight screenings, which are free.

Besides focusing on making a film that people will enjoy, Kaiserman also hopes that he will have a positive impact on all those he comes in contact with.

"I want to look back on what I have done and be able to say that it was something positive," he said. "I won’t be happy until I’m able to say that."


Return to top